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| Event type

Two, Men

Date30 – 31 January 1948
StatusOlympic
LocationOlympia Bobrun, St. Moritz / Celerina
Participants32 from 9 countries
FormatFour runs, total time determined placement.
Venue detailsCurves: 17
Length: 1722 m
Start Altitude: ?
Vertical Drop: 130 m

Shortly before the competition began allegations of sabotage against one of the American bobs reached the newspapers. The sled had been left overnight in a garage and was found badly damaged in the morning. Though the press cried foul it was eventually discovered to be the result of a clumsy parking manoeuvre rather than anything sinister.

When the event began it became apparent that the two Swiss bobs were in a class of their own. Having placed 1-2 when the World Championships visited the same track the previous winter it became a simple matter of whether the relative youngster Felix Endrich could overcome the 39-year old veteran of the Garmisch Olympics, Fritz Feierabend, pilot of the 1947 World Champion sled.

The gold medal was decided on the first day on competition when Endrich’s team built up a lead of over two and a half seconds. Feierabend closed the gap on second day but the damage was already done and Endrich and brakeman Fritz Waller were crowned as champions.The battle for the bronze medal was also closely contested but was decided in favour of the number two USA team ahead of Belgium.

Lake Placid funeral director Tuffield Latour piloted the USA I bob in Sankt-Moritz and fifty-four years later his grandson, also named Tuffield and a former bobsleigh pilot himself, coached the winning American sled in the inaugural Olympic women’s event.

Fritz Feierabend was the builder of most of the championship sleds used in the late 1940s and early 50s.

PosNrBobsleighNOCTimeRun 1Run 2Run 3Run 4
1Switzerland IISUI5:29.21:22.4 (1)1:22.7 (1)1:21.7 (2)1:22.4 (2)Gold
Felix EndrichFritz Waller
2Switzerland ISUI5:30.41:23.7 (2)1:24.0 (2)1:21.4 (1)1:21.3 (1)Silver
Fritz FeierabendPaul Eberhard
3United States IIUSA5:35.31:25.5 (8)1:24.1 (3)1:22.5 (3)1:23.2 (3)Bronze
Fred Fortune, Jr.Sky Carron
4Belgium IBEL5:37.51:24.4 (3)1:24.4 (=4)1:24.5 (10)1:24.2 (=6)
Max HoubenJacques Mouvet
5Great Britain IGBR5:37.91:25.2 (7)1:24.4 (=4)1:24.2 (9)1:24.1 (5)
William ColesPennington Collings
6Italy IIITA5:38.01:25.0 (5)1:25.0 (=8)1:23.8 (6)1:24.2 (=6)
Mario VitaliDario Poggi
7Norway IINOR5:38.21:25.6 (9)1:25.0 (=8)1:23.7 (5)1:23.9 (4)
Arne HolstIvar Johansen
8Italy IITA5:38.61:25.1 (6)1:25.1 (11)1:24.0 (7)1:24.4 (8)
Nino BibbiaEdilberto Campadese
9United States IUSA5:39.21:24.9 (4)1:24.8 (6)1:24.1 (8)1:25.4 (12)
Tuffy LatourLeo Martin
10Belgium IIBEL5:39.81:26.8 (12)1:24.9 (7)1:23.6 (4)1:24.5 (9)
Marcel LeclefGeorge Niels
11France IFRA5:40.41:25.8 (=10)1:25.3 (12)1:24.7 (11)1:24.6 (10)
Henri Achille FouldHenri Evrot
12France IIFRA5:40.51:25.8 (=10)1:25.0 (=8)1:24.9 (12)1:24.8 (11)
William Gayraud-HirigoyenLouis Saint-Calbre
13Norway INOR5:46.51:27.1 (13)1:27.1 (15)1:26.1 (13)1:26.2 (13)
Bjarne SchrøenGunnar Thoresen
14Czechoslovakia TCH5:46.61:27.2 (14)1:26.4 (13)1:26.3 (14)1:26.7 (14)
Max IppenEduard Novotný
15Argentina ARG5:52.81:29.2 (16)1:28.5 (16)1:27.8 (15)1:27.3 (15)
Marcelo de RidderHéctor Tomasi
ACGreat Britain IIGBR1:27.9 (15)1:26.8 (14)– (AC)– (DNS)DNF
Tony GaddBasil Wellicome