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| Event type

Team Relay, Mixed

Date13 February 2014 — 20:15
StatusOlympic
LocationTsentr Sannogo Sporta Sanki, Mountain Cluster, Rzhanaya Polyana
Participants48 from 12 countries
Venue detailsCurves: 16
Length: 1384 m
Start Altitude: 829 m
Vertical Drop: 118 m

A team competition decided by the total time of separate runs in each of the three disciplines of the sport had been contested at the World Championships since 1989 but it was not until 2008 that the format was changed to a relay. This move proved popular and undoubtedly helped propel the event towards Olympic status. Each luger hit a touchpad at the end of their run, which then released a gate at the top of the course for the next luger to start their run and total time determining the winning team. As Germany had already won the individual and doubles events, the main question appeared to be who would take the minor medals.

Of the more favoured teams, Latvia set the early pace with a combined time of 2:47.295. This was immediately bettered by the host nation Russia who completed the course in a time of 2:46.679 and took over the lead. The United States and Italy then went down the course, but failed to dislodge the top two. Germany, using all their gold medallists, went on to post the best time of 2:45.649, over a second ahead of second placed Russia and completing a clean sweep of luge gold medals. Canada, starting next-to-last, briefly threatened to take the bronze medal, but eventually finished 0.1 seconds behind Latvia. With the German victory, Natalie Geisenberger became the first woman to win two luge gold medals at the same games.

The coach of the 4th place Canadian team was unhappy at what he believed were suspicious changes in track temperature during the event. The official data revealed that the track temperature rose by a degree between the runs of the 1st set of teams (which included Russia), and the higher ranking 2nd set of 5 teams, despite the air temperature falling by the same margin. When challenged to make an official protest over the incident, the Canadians declined.

In May 2016 WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency) commissioned a report, the McLaren Report, to look into allegations of systematic Russian doping and a cover-up to avoid positives at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. The report was released in two parts, in July and December 2016, and confirmed the allegations. In 2017 the IOC formed a commission to investigate this, headed by IOC Member Denis Oswald, and usually referred to as the Oswald Commission. In late October 2017 the Oswald Commission began to release its findings.

On 22 December 2017 Albert Demchenko and Tatyana Ivanova were disqualified as a result of the Oswald Commission findings, which disqualified the silver medal winning Russian team. They immediately appealed this decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), and about 10 days before the PyeongChang Winter Olympics began, the CAS reached a decision and both athletes were exonerated and the Russian silver medal was restored.

PosNrTeamNOCTimeReactionSplit 1Split 2Exchange
110GermanyGER2:45.649Gold
10-1Natalie Geisenberger54.095 (1)22.464 (1)40.511 (1)54.095 (1)
10-2Felix Loch55.639 (1)2.186 (2)24.511 (1)42.357 (1)1:49.734 (1)
10-3Tobias Wendl55.915 (1)2.297 (=1)24.64 (1)42.537 (1)2:45.649 (1)
10-3Tobias Arlt
27Russian FederationRUS2:46.679Silver1
7-1Tatyana Ivanova54.429 (3)22.564 (4)40.737 (3)54.429 (3)2
7-2Albert Demchenko55.775 (2)2.26 (6)24.684 (5)42.541 (2)1:50.204 (2)3
7-3Aleksandr Denisyev56.475 (3)2.374 (5)24.834 (4)42.882 (2)2:46.679 (2)
7-3Vladislav Antonov
36LatviaLAT2:47.295Bronze
6-1Elīza Tīruma54.745 (5)22.67 (5)40.906 (5)54.745 (5)
6-2Mārtiņš Rubenis56.048 (4)2.277 (=8)24.715 (6)42.65 (4)1:50.793 (4)
6-3Andris Šics56.502 (4)2.414 (7)24.86 (6)42.925 (4)2:47.295 (3)
6-3Juris Šics
411CanadaCAN2:47.395
11-1Alex Gough54.643 (4)22.56 (3)40.808 (4)54.643 (4)
11-2Sam Edney56.197 (5)2.178 (1)24.602 (2)42.651 (5)1:50.840 (5)
11-3Tristan Walker56.555 (5)2.348 (3)24.782 (2)42.949 (5)2:47.395 (4)
11-3Justin Snith
59ItalyITA2:47.420
9-1Sandra Gasparini54.823 (6)22.699 (6)40.973 (6)54.823 (6)
9-2Armin Zöggeler56.039 (3)2.277 (=8)24.676 (4)42.649 (3)1:50.862 (6)
9-3Christian Oberstolz56.558 (6)2.363 (4)24.85 (5)42.958 (6)2:47.420 (5)
9-3Patrick Gruber
68United StatesUSA2:47.555
8-1Erin Hamlin54.338 (2)22.552 (2)40.669 (2)54.338 (2)
8-2Chris Mazdzer56.245 (6)2.194 (3)24.622 (3)42.701 (6)1:50.583 (3)
8-3Christian Niccum56.972 (7)2.297 (=1)24.823 (3)43.101 (7)2:47.555 (6)
8-3Jayson Terdiman
712AustriaAUT2:48.477
12-1Miriam Kastlunger55.596 (8)22.894 (12)41.45 (10)55.596 (8)
12-2Wolfgang Kindl56.434 (7)2.281 (10)24.765 (8)42.875 (8)1:52.030 (8)
12-3Andreas Linger56.447 (2)2.388 (6)24.87 (7)42.915 (3)2:48.477 (7)
12-3Wolfgang Linger
83PolandPOL2:49.753
3-1Natalia Wojtusciszyn54.937 (7)22.746 (7)41.045 (7)54.937 (7)
3-2Maciej Kurowski56.737 (9)2.276 (7)24.879 (10)43.005 (9)1:51.674 (7)
3-3Patryk Poręba58.079 (10)2.504 (10)25.371 (10)43.934 (10)2:49.753 (8)
3-3Karol Mikrut
94Czech RepublicCZE2:49.805
4-1Vendula Kotenová55.600 (9)22.874 (9)41.372 (8)55.600 (9)
4-2Ondřej Hyman56.926 (11)2.258 (5)24.813 (9)43.102 (10)1:52.526 (10)
4-3Lukáš Brož57.279 (8)2.422 (8)25.039 (8)43.326 (8)2:49.805 (9)
4-3Antonín Brož
105SlovakiaSVK2:50.165
5-1Viera Gbúrová55.757 (11)22.807 (8)41.399 (9)55.757 (11)
5-2Jozef Ninis56.472 (8)2.243 (4)24.715 (6)42.795 (7)1:52.229 (9)
5-3Marián Zemaník57.936 (9)2.462 (9)25.141 (9)43.443 (9)2:50.165 (10)
5-3Jozef Petrulák
112UkraineUKR2:51.055
2-1Olena Shkhumova55.671 (10)22.893 (11)41.479 (11)55.671 (10)
2-2Andriy Kis56.882 (10)2.360 (12)24.906 (11)43.107 (11)1:52.553 (11)
2-3Oleksandr Obolonchyk58.502 (12)2.530 (11)25.431 (11)44.176 (11)2:51.055 (11)
2-3Roman Zakharkiv
121Republic of KoreaKOR2:52.629
1-1Seong Eun-Ryeong56.174 (12)22.884 (10)41.695 (12)56.174 (12)
1-2Kim Dong-Hyeon57.986 (12)2.336 (11)25.081 (12)43.603 (12)1:54.160 (12)
1-3Park Jin-Yong58.469 (11)2.641 (12)25.553 (12)44.206 (12)2:52.629 (12)
1-3Jo Jeong-Myeong