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| Event type

Combined, Men

Date7 – 9 February 1936
StatusOlympic
LocationKreuzeck-Gebiet, Garmisch-Partenkirchen / Gudiberg, Garmisch-Partenkirchen
Participants66 from 21 countries
FormatOne downhill run and two slalom runs, point tables determined placement.
Course Setter (Downhill)H. VotschGER
Course Setter (Run 1)H. VotschGER
Course Setter (Run 2)H. VotschGER
Venue detailsGates: ? / 33 / 33
Length: 3800 m / 600 m / 600 m
Start Altitude: ?
Vertical Drop: 959 m / 200 m / 200 m

One of the hotly debated issues in the last months before the Olympic Games in Garmisch-Partenkirchen was about the status of the ski instructors. In 1932, the Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) had decided to permit instructors to compete in international competitions. At the IOC Session in Oslo in the winter of 1935, the IOC informed the FIS that paid ski instructors would not be allowed to participate in the Winter Olympics. One of the victims of this decision was the Austrian skier Toni Seelos, world champion in Alpine Combination in 1935. Seelos was also the coach for Christel Cranz, who won the women’s Alpine Combination in the 1936 games. According to contemporary reports, Seelos was a test skier in the first round in the slalom event in the Olympic Winter Games, and recorded a time 6 seconds better than the fastest time in the competition! Austria and Switzerland declined to enter a team in the men’s event in protest against the IOC decision to exclude the ski instructors from the Olympics.

Among the entries, he silver medalist in the combination at the 1936 World Championships, the French skier Émile Allais from Megève, was among the hottest names, together with the German favorites Franz Pfnür (gold in 1935 downhill) and Gustav Lantscher, the Austrian-born world champion in the 1932 downhill who received German citizenship in 1935. The home favorite Roman Wörndle and 17-year-old Rudi Cranz, the little brother of the Olympic champion Christel Cranz, completed the strong German team. Unlike Laila Schou Nilsen, the Norwegian Birger Ruud, Olympic champion in ski jumping 1932, was also a well known name among the alpine skiers. He won bronze in the Alpine Combined at the 1935 World Championships, and knew the slopes of Kreuzjoch quite well, since he had stayed in Garmisch for several months during the last two years, working as a very popular assistant in a local sport shop.

The men’s downhill course was 3,800 m. with a descent of 959 m., and the competition started at noon, one hour after the start of the women’s race. The four best placed in the competition were the first four to finish, and were the only competitors able to break the 5 minute barrier. With start number 1, Lantschner crossed the finishing line in 4:58.2. The next skier Allais came close, recording 4:58.8. With start number 3, Ruud made an excellent time of 4:47.4, taking the lead with a +10 second’s margin. Pfnür, with start number 5, was unable to beat the Norwegian, but with the second best time of 4:51.8 he was in good position before the slalom event.

Two days later the slalom event was organized in Gudiberg, and the start and finishing points were the same as for the women the day before. The men however had to negotiate 33 gates, 10 more than the ladies. In the first round Ruud spoiled his medal chances by missing a gate – he had to climb back and also received a 6 seconds penalty – giving him a time over 20 seconds behind the leader. Pfnür had the best time in both rounds and won the gold medal easily. Lantschner secured a German double by keeping ahead of Allais in both rounds. Home favorite Wörndle was given a 6 seconds penalty in the second round and was unable to catch Ruud, and the young and talented Cranz was out of contention for medals after a 12 second penalty in the first round. In the second round he was only 0.1 seconds behind the champion Pfnür. Six years later both Wörndle and Cranz had become victims of the World War II, both losing their lives on the Eastern front as soldiers in the Wehrmacht.

PosNrSkierNOCPointsDownhillSlalom
15Franz PfnürGER99.254:51.8 (2)2:26.6 (1)Gold
21Gustav LantschnerGER96.264:58.2 (3)2:32.5 (2)Silver
32Émile AllaisFRA94.694:58.8 (4)2:37.3 (3)Bronze
43Birger RuudNOR93.384:47.4 (1)2:49.0 (6)
58Roman WörndleGER91.165:01.2 (6)2:48.7 (5)
614Rudi CranzGER91.035:04.0 (8)2:47.5 (4)
721Cinto SertorelliITA90.395:05.0 (9)2:49.4 (7)
89Alf KonningenNOR90.065:00.4 (5)2:53.6 (9)
96Per FossumNOR88.125:03.2 (7)3:00.0 (15)
1031Dick Durrance, Jr.USA87.745:16.2 (11)2:53.3 (8)
1129Maurice LafforgueFRA85.835:29.4 (14)2:53.7 (10)
127Peter LunnGBR83.825:35.6 (15)2:58.8 (13)
1319George PageUSA82.855:42.8 (18)2:59.1 (14)
1463James Palmer-TomkinsonGBR82.525:51.0 (24)2:56.3 (11)
1524Ciril PračekYUG81.545:39.4 (=16)3:07.0 (17)
1637Walter HollmannTCH81.015:45.6 (19)3:05.9 (16)
1764Adriano GuarnieriITA80.945:26.4 (13)3:18.6 (25)
1832Vittorio ChierroniITA80.805:20.0 (12)3:24.2 (27)
1967László SzalayHUN79.686:14.4 (32)2:57.5 (12)
2011Bronisław CzechPOL79.415:46.4 (20)3:13.3 (19)
2155Johann KnahlTCH78.415:52.4 (25)3:14.8 (21)
2235Roland AllardFRA77.865:49.4 (22)3:19.6 (26)
2350Robert Livermore, Jr.USA77.186:04.4 (29)3:14.2 (20)
2422Horst ScheeserROU76.556:03.4 (28)3:18.1 (24)
2554Franci ČopYUG75.886:13.6 (31)3:15.9 (22)
2616Walter PickTCH75.305:49.6 (23)3:34.4 (29)
2727Károly KőváriHUN75.056:00.4 (27)3:28.4 (28)
2834Karol ZającPOL74.876:20.6 (34)3:17.5 (23)
2946Sydney HudsonGBR73.926:41.4 (40)3:12.3 (18)
3015Tibor CsíkHUN72.245:48.2 (21)3:56.7 (32)
3147Bertil PerssonSWE70.956:26.0 (=35)3:37.4 (30)
3253Fedor WeinschenkPOL65.676:26.0 (=35)4:17.8 (33)
3336Emil ŽnidarYUG61.848:02.2 (50)3:48.8 (31)
AC28Eduard HromádkaTCH5:39.4 (=16)– (AC)DNF
AC13Karl Johan BaadsvikCAN5:55.2 (26)– (AC)DNF
AC20Borislav YordanovBUL6:06.4 (30)– (AC)DNF
AC56Willi ZachariasROU6:16.2 (33)– (AC)DNF
AC66Link WashburnUSA6:30.8 (37)– (AC)DNF
AC26William BallCAN6:40.6 (39)– (AC)DNF
AC69Isamu SekiguchiJPN6:48.6 (41)– (AC)DNF
AC58Raymond de BraconnierBEL6:52.0 (42)– (AC)DNF
AC39Dimitrios NegrepontisGRE6:58.6 (43)– (AC)DNF
AC25Werner De SpoelberchBEL7:03.0 (44)– (AC)DNF
AC38Rudolf KloecknerROU7:16.4 (45)– (AC)DNF
AC44Tsutomu SekidoJPN7:23.4 (46)– (AC)DNF
AC62Bud ClarkCAN7:29.0 (47)– (AC)DNF
AC33Iosif CovaciROU7:56.8 (48)– (AC)DNF
AC61Hiroshi TadanoJPN7:58.6 (49)– (AC)DNF
AC60Hubert NegeleLIE8:09.4 (51)– (AC)DNF
AC41Jacques PetenBEL10:09.2 (52)– (AC)DNF
AC59Asen TsankovBUL10:53.2 (53)– (AC)DNF
AC43Franz SchädlerLIE11:59.8 (54)– (AC)DNF
AC40Herberts BērtulsonsLAT13:00.6 (55)– (AC)DNF
AC57Askolds HermanovskisLAT13:22.4 (56)– (AC)DNF
AC49Nazım AslangilTUR13:56.8 (57)– (AC)DNF
AC68Ülker PamirTUR14:18.4 (58)– (AC)DNF
AC23Sigmund RuudNOR5:11.6 (10)DNF
AC51Levente BalatoniHUN6:36.6 (38)DNF
AC65Mehmut Şevket KarmanTUR14:29.2 (59)DNF
AC70Reşat ErceşTUR22:44.4 (60)DNF
AC42Boyan DimitrovBUL8:52.6 (AC)DNF
AC52Raoul WeckbeckerLUX– (AC)DNF
AC48Rolando ZanniITA– (AC)DNF
AC12Charles BrachtBEL– (AC)DNF
AC10Hubert HajmYUG– (AC)DNF
AC4James RiddellGBR– (AC)DNF
DNS45Tom MobraatenCAN– (DNS)
DNS17René LafforgueFRA– (DNS)
DNS30Sven ErikssonSWE– (DNS)
DNS18Gustaf LarssonSWE– (DNS)